Canandaigua
Sportsmen's
Club

Conservation

The Candandaigua Sportsmen's Club members are dedicated to conservation and responsible use of wilderness areas. We manage our property so that it remains a healthy and vital place for people and wildlife alike. Our members are involved with a variety of wilderness and wildlife conservation organizations and activities.

On this page you'll find information about recent conservation efforts and topics as well as links to related organizations. Our world is both rewarding to enjoy and our responsibility to shepherd - get involved!

Giant Hogweed - Do Not Touch!


Giant Hogweed
by Fritz Geller-Grimm

Giant Hogweed is a noxious weed that can grow to 12 feet or more in height. It has hollow, ridged stems with purple blotches, large leaves up to 5 feet across, and white flower heads up to 2.5 feet across. It is sometimes mistaken for Cow Parsnip, Wild Parsnip, Angelica, or Poison Hemlock.

Contact with Giant Hogweed sap in combination with moisture and sunlight can lead to skin and eye irritation, blistering, and possibly blindness. Do not touch this plant! It is a serious health risk. See your physician if you think you may have come in contact with this plant.


Purple Stems
by NYS DEC

Giant Hogweed plants were brought to the United States in the early 1900s as garden plants and have since escaped and established themselves across 11 states, including every county in western New York.

For more details about Giant Hogweed, see the New York State DEC web site where you will find information and photographs on identification of Giant Hogweed, health risks of coming in contact with its sap, existing sightings within New York State, and contact information if you think you have spotted a Giant Hogweed plant.

Emerald Ash Borer


Emerald Ash Borer
by David Cappaert
www.forestryimages.org

The emerald ash borer is an Asian beetle that infests and destroys ash trees. The adult beetle is only 0.5 inches in length with metallic green wing covers and a purple or red abdomen. The seasonal height of their activity is in June and July.

Most trees die within four years of being attacked by the beetles. Signs of emerald ash borer presence include canopy die off, yellowing and browning leaves, S-shaped larval galleries in the bark, and D-shaped emergence holes in the bark left by larvae that have reached the adult stage.


Larval Gallery
Forest Service, USDA

This beetle has already killed off tens of millions of ash trees in the United States since it was initially discovered in Michigan, and has since spread to many other states, including at least six counties in New York.

For more details about the emerald ash borer, see the New York State DEC web site where you will find information and photographs on identification of the beetle, signs of affected trees, existing sightings within New York State, and contact information if you think you have spotted an emerald ash borer infestation.

When in the field keep a lookout for signs of the emerald ash borer - help protect our ash trees!